Confession is one of the least understood of the sacraments of the Catholic Church.

In reconciling us to God,

it is a great source of grace,

and Catholics are encouraged

to take advantage of it often.

Confession Is a Sacrament:

The Sacrament of Penance, commonly called Confession, is one of the seven sacraments recognized by the Catholic Church. Catholics believe that all of the sacraments were instituted by Jesus Christ himself.

In the case of Confession, that institution occurred on Easter Sunday, when Christ first appeared to the apostles after his Resurrection. Breathing on them, he said: “Receive the Holy Spirit. For those whose sins you forgive, they are forgiven; for those whose sins you retain, they are retained” (John 20:22-23).

The Marks of the Sacrament:

Catholics also believe that the sacraments are an outward sign of an inward grace. In this case, the outward sign is the absolution, or forgiveness of sins, that the priest grants to the penitent (the person confessing his / her sins); the inward grace is the reconciliation of the penitent to God (which is why the sacrament is also sometimes called the Sacrament of Reconciliation).



The Purpose of Confession:

That reconciling of man to God is the purpose of Confession. When we sin, we deprive ourselves of God’s grace. And by doing so, we make it even easier to sin some more. The only way out of this downward cycle is to acknowledge our sins, to repent of them, and to ask God’s forgiveness. Then, in the Sacrament of Confession, grace can be restored to our souls, and we can once again resist sin.

What Is Required?

Three things are required of a penitent in order to receive the sacrament worthily:

  1. He/she must be contrite—or, in other words, sorry for his sins.
  2. He/she must confess those sins fully, in kind and in number.
  3. He/she must be willing to do penance and make amends for his sins.

How Often Should You Go to Confession?

While Catholics are only required to go to Confession when they are aware that they have committed a mortal sin,
the Church urges the faithful to take advantage of the sacrament often.

A good rule of thumb is to go once per month. (The Church strongly recommends that, in preparation for fulfilling our Easter Duty to receive communion, we go to Confession even if we are aware of venial sin only.)

The Church especially urges the faithful to receive the Sacrament of Confession frequently during Lent, to help them in their spiritual preparation for Easter.

Why Is Confession Necessary?

Non-Catholics, and even many Catholics, often ask whether they can confess their sins directly to God, and
whether God can forgive them without going through a priest. On the most basic level, of course, the answer is yes, and Catholics should make frequent acts of contrition, which are prayers in which we tell God that we are sorry
for our sins and ask for His forgiveness.

But the question misses the point of the Sacrament of Confession. The sacrament, by its very nature, confers graces that help us to live a Christian life, which is why
the Church requires us to receive it at least once per year. Moreover, it was instituted by Christ as the proper form for the forgiveness of our sins.Therefore, we should not only be willing to receive the sacrament, but we should embrace it as a gift from a loving God.

 

 

 

How to

 

prepare for the

 

Sacrament

 

of Confession

 

 



Remember

 



If you need help – especially if you have been away for some time – simply ask the priest and he will help you by
"walking" you through the steps to make a good confession.

 



Before Confession

 



Be truly sorry for your sins. The essential act of Penance, on the part of the penitent, is contrition, a clear and decisive rejection of the sin committed, together with a resolution not to commit it again, out of the love one has for God and which is reborn with repentance.

 



The resolution to avoid committing these sins in
the future (amendment) is a sure sign that your sorrow is genuine and authentic. This does not mean that a promise never to fall again into sin is necessary. A resolution to try to avoid the near occasions of sin suffices for true repentance. God's grace in cooperation with the intention to rectify your life will give you the strength to resist and overcome temptation in the future.

 



Examination of Conscience

 



Before going to Confession you should make a review of mortal and venial sins since your last sacramental confession, and should express sorrow for sins, hatred for sins and a firm resolution not to sin again.

 



A helpful pattern for examination of conscience is to review the Commandments of God and the Precepts of the church:

 



  1. Have God and the pursuit of sanctity in Christ been the goal of my life? Have I denied my faith? Have I placed my trust in false teachings or substitutes for God? Did I despair of God's mercy?
  2. Have I avoided the profane use of God's name in my speech? Have I broken a solemn vow or promise?
  3. Have I honored every Sunday by avoiding unnecessary work, celebrating the Mass (also holydays)? Was I inattentive at, or unnecessarily late for Mass, or did I leave early? Have I neglected prayer for a long time?
  4. Have I shown Christlike respect to parents, spouse, and family members, legitimate authorities? Have I been attentive to the religious education and formation of my children?
  5. Have I cared for the bodily health and safety of myself and all others? Did I abuse drugs or alcohol? Have I supported in any way abortion, "mercy killing," or suicide?
  6. Was I impatient, angry, envious, proud, jealous, revengeful, lazy? Have I forgiven others?
  7. Have I been just in my responsibilities to employer and employees? Have I discriminated against others because of race or other reasons?
  8. Have I been chaste in thought and word? Have I used sex only within marriage and while open to procreating life? Have I given myself sexual gratification? Did I deliberately look at impure TV, pictures, reading?
  9. Have I stolen anything from another, from my employer, from government? If so, am I ready to repay it? Did I fulfill my contracts? Did I rashly gamble, depriving my family of necessities?
  10. Have I spoken ill of any other person? Have I always told the truth? Have I kept secrets and confidences?
  11. Have I permitted sexual thoughts about someone to whom I am not married?
  12. Have I desired what belongs to other people? Have I wished ill on another?
  13. Have I been faithful to sacramental living (Holy Communion and Penance)?
  14. Have I helped make my parish community stronger and holier? Have I contributed to the support of the Church?
  15. Have I done penance by abstaining and fasting on obligatory days? Have I fasted before receiving communion?
  16. Have I been mindful of the poor? Do I accept God's will for me?

 

During Confession

 



After examining your conscience and telling God of your sorrow, go into the confessional. 

 

At St. Joseph's he confessional is at the back of the  Lady Chapel (Chapel on the left as you look at the main altar),  

 

Kneel at the screen in the small room or sit on the chair if you are iunable to sit.                   

 

Begin your confession with the sign of the cross, "In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.
My last confession was _________ weeks (months, years) ago."

 



Say the sins that you remember. Start with the one(s) that is most difficult to say. (In order to make a good confession the faithful must confess all mortal sins, according to kind and number.)

 

After confessing all the sins you remember since your last good confession, you may conclude by saying, "I am sorry for these and all the sins of my past life."

 



Listen to the words of the priest. He will assign you some penance. Doing the penance will diminish the temporal
punishment due to sins already forgiven. When invited, express some prayer of sorrow or Act of Contrition such as:

 



An Act of Contrition

O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended you and I detest all my sins, because I dread the loss of heaven and the pains of hell. But most of all because I have offended you, my God, who are all good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve with the help of your grace, to confess my sins, to do penance and to amend my life. Amen.

 



At the End of Confession

 



As you listen to the words of forgiveness you may make the sign of the cross with the priest.

 



After Confession

 



Give thanks to God for forgiving you again. If you recall some serious sin you forgot to tell, rest assured that it has been forgiven with the others, but be sure to confess it in your next Confession.

 



Do your assigned Penance.

 

Resolve to return to the Sacrament of Reconciliation
often. We Catholics are fortunate to have the Sacrament of Reconciliation. It is the ordinary way for us to have our sins forgiven. This sacrament is a powerful help to get rid of our weaknesses, grow in holiness, and lead a balanced and virtuous life.

 

 



Further Tips For Making A Good Confession.

We should…

  1) …examine our consciences regularly and thoroughly;

  2) …wait our turn in line patiently;

  3) …come at the time confessions are scheduled,

not a few minutes before they are to end;

  4) …speak distinctly but never so loudly that we might be
overheard;

  5) …state our sins clearly and briefly without rambling;

  6) …confess all mortal sins in number and kind;

  7) …listen carefully to the advice the priest gives;

  8) …confess our own sins and not someone else’s;

  9) …carefully listen to and remember the penance and be sure to understand it;

10) …use a regular formula for confession so that it is familiar and comfortable;

11) …never be afraid to say something "embarrassing"… just say it;

12) …never worry that the priest thinks we are stupid…. he is usually impressed by our courage;

13) …never fear that the priest will not keep our confession secret… he is bound by the Seal;

14) …never confess "tendencies" or "struggles"… just
sins;

15) …never leave the confessional before the priest has finished giving absolution;

16) …memorize an Act of Contrition;

17) …answer the priest’s questions briefly if he asks for a
clarification;

18) …ask questions if we can’t understand what he means when he tells us something;

19) …keep in mind that sometimes priests can have bad days just like we do;

20) …remember that priests must go to confession too … they know what we are going through.

 

Together we

follow God

& serve

the people

of Bilston,

Coseley

& East Park.

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© stjosephwolverhampton St. Joseph's Church, Stowheath Lane, Wolverhampton. WV1 2QN